Chapters

Dancing through Black British ballet: conversations with dancers.

Dancing through Black British ballet: conversations with dancers.

Co-written with Dr Tia-Monique Uzor, this chapter, reflects on conversations with a number of non-white British dancers who have a long standing dance careers in ballet. The chapter maps histories of resilience and resistance in Britain and internationally.

Akinleye, A. & T Uzor (2021) Dancing through Black British ballet: conversations with dancers Akinleye (ed.) (re:)claiming ballet London: Intellect books pp.216-231

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Ballet, from Property to Art

Ballet, from Property to Art

In this chapter, I reflect on ballet using two lenses of property (ballet-as-property) and inheritance (the Manor House of Ballet). I draw on Dr Cheryl Harris’s seminal paper ‘Whiteness as Property’ to explore how ballet could be seen as being treated as the property of a few rather than an art form in its own right. I suggest that being liberated into being ‘an art form’ offers ballet a rich future that avoids the decay of protectionism.

Akinleye, A.(2021) Ballet, from property to art, in Akinleye (ed.) (re:)claiming ballet London: Intellect books pp.21-35

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Epistemology of the weekend: Youth Dance Theatre

Epistemology of the weekend: Youth Dance Theatre

With Hopal Romans and Michael Joseph, I remember their experiences in early Youth Dance Companies in Britain. For many young people dancing was a distraction from the turmoil of being a Black teenager in Britain in 1970s and 1980s. Many young people from these early youth companies went on to have distinguished careers in dance internationally.

Akinleye, A., H. Romans and M. Joseph (2018) Epistemology of the weekend: Youth Dance Theatre, in Akinleye (ed.) Narratives in Black British dance: embodied practices. London: Palgrave MacMillian pp.265-276

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In-the-bewteen-ness: Decolonising and re-inhabiting our dancing

In-the-bewteen-ness: Decolonising and re-inhabiting our dancing

In this chapter I write with Helen Kindred, we discuss our need to be alert to polarising Western binaries creeping into our creative processes in the language we use to discuss, describe and facilitate dance. The chapter discusses ways we have sort to decolonize the environment of our creative exploration.

Akinleye, A. and H. Kindred (2018). In-the-Between-ness: Decolonising and re-inhabiting our dancing, in Akinleye (ed.) Narratives in Black British dance: embodied practices London: Palgrave MacMillian pp. 65-78.

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Narratives in Black British Dance: an introduction

Narratives in Black British Dance: an introduction

In order to introduce the narratives in the chapters that follow, this introductory chapter positions a range of approaches to the terms Black, British, and Dance. The chapter discusses how artists who identify are cross contribute to a dance scene whose complexities and stories are often invisiblized.

Akinleye, A.(2018). Narratives in Black British Dance: an introduction, in Akinleye (ed.) Narratives in Black British dance: embodied practices. London: Palgrave MacMillian pp. 1- 17

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Narrating Spaces

Narrating Spaces

In this chapter I discuss creativity: creative processes from the perspective of someone who identifies as a Black, Woman, Artist. Immediately I need to point out that I by no means want to suggest that there is some kind of shared creative outcome that all Black Women Artists demonstrate. The nature of creativity seems to be that it is inherently individual in everyone.

Akinleye, A. (2016) Narrating Spaces chapter in Brookes, Black Women in Dance: Stepping out of the barriers, Serendipity Artists Movement Ltd, pp. 74 – 83

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Her life in Movement: Reflections on embodiment as a methodology

Her life in Movement: Reflections on embodiment as a methodology

In this chapter, my aim is to share thoughts about the design of research and theoretical frameworks that place the bodily experience – movement – as central. In such a short amount of text I hope to merely start a conversation. The book adopts a multi-disciplinary lens, moving beyond the traditional dualism of body and mind, and incorporating the physical with the social and the psychological.

Akinleye, A. (2015) Her life in Movement: Reflections on embodiment as a methodology chapter in Wellard, Ian Researching Embodied Sport: Exploring movement cultures, Routledge, pp.178-196

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Play: ‘ideas are statements not of what is or what has been but of acts to be performed’

Play: ‘ideas are statements not of what is or what has been but of acts to be performed’

In this chapter I challenge the perceived divide between doing and thinking, inherited from a Western dualist divide between body and mind. I suggest playful acts of choreography to transgress the separation of physical and mental in the process of creating a theoretical framework for research study.

Akinleye, A. (2019). Play: ‘ideas are statements not of what is or what has been but of acts to be performed’. In J. Bacon, Hilton, R., Kramer, P., and Midgelow, V. (Ed.), Researching (in/as) Motion: A Resource Collection, Artistic Doctorates in Europe: Theatre Academy, University of the Arts Helsinki.

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