Chapters

Dancing Un-Visible Bodies

Dancing Un-Visible Bodies

I discuss how issues of marginalization in the dance studio raised by prejudices against age, ethnicity and/or gender have shared lessons of resilience. From my own presence as an experienced, Black, female body in Western dance settings, I look at social and cultural theory to describe the older dancer as having many bodies. I draw on personal reflections gathered over a year of observations of myself taking dance classes, suggesting strategies for surviving racism in my youth as a Black ballerina offer modes for thriving in the face of exclusionary practices around aging in dance.

Link to publisher 

Citation: Akinleye A. (2022) Dancing Un-Visible Bodies. In: Musil P., Risner D., Schupp K. (eds) Dancing Across the Lifespan. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham. pp 113 -128 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-82866-0_8

About the book:

This book critically examines matters of age and aging in relation to dance. As a novel collection of diverse authors’ voices, this edited book traverses the human lifespan from early childhood to death as it negotiates a breadth of dance experiences and contexts. The conversations ignited within each chapter invite readers to interrogate current disciplinary attitudes and dominant assumptions and serve as catalysts for changing and evolving long entrenched views among dancers regarding matters of age and aging.

The text is organized in three sections, each representing a specific context within which dance exists. Section titles include educational contexts, social and cultural contexts, and artistic contexts. Within these broad categories, each contributor’s milieu of lived experiences illuminate age-related factors and their many intersections. While several contributing authors address and problematize the phenomenon of aging in mid-life and beyond, other authors tackle important issues that impact young dancers and dance professionals. 

Pam Musil, MA, is a professor emeritus of Dance, Brigham Young University, USA, and a former associate chair of the Department of Dance. As a post-retirement, she works as an independent researcher with interests that include human issues related to dance and literacy, education, gender, and age within populations that span grades 7-12, postsecondary dance education and beyond.

Doug Risner, Ph.D., MFA, professor of dance, distinguished faculty fellow, and director, MA in Dance and Theater Teaching Artistry at Wayne State University, USA, conducts research on the sociology of dance training and education. His book, Masculinity, Intersectionality and Identity: Why Boys (Don’t) Dance [2022], is published by Palgrave MacMillan.

Karen Schupp, MFA, is an associate professor of dance and an associate director of the Herberger Institute School of Music, Dance, and Theater at Arizona State University, USA. Her research interests include dance competition culture, dance curriculum and pedagogy in tertiary education, and equity across the spectrum of dance education.

 

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For Kaydence and her cousins: Health & Happiness in cultural legacies and contemporary contexts

For Kaydence and her cousins: Health & Happiness in cultural legacies and contemporary contexts

I contribute Chapter Three to this anthology. The chapter discusses the making of a performance work for young indigenous audiences. I suggest that being a part of, and the making together of, art is a healing and vital process: one that is particularly important for the next generation’s ability to determine themselves with creative agency.

Link to publisher

Citation: Akinleye. A (2021) ‘For Kaydence and her cousins’ in Van Styvendale, N., McDougall, J. D., Henry, R., & Innes, R. A. (Eds.). The Arts of Indigenous Health and Well-being. Univ. of Manitoba Press. pp 60-75

About the book: 

Drawing attention to the ways in which creative practices are essential to the health, well-being, and healing of Indigenous peoples, The Arts of Indigenous Health and Well-Being addresses the effects of artistic endeavour on the “good life”, or mino-pimatisiwin in Cree, which can be described as the balanced interconnection of physical, emotional, spiritual, and mental well-being. In this interdisciplinary collection, Indigenous knowledges inform an approach to health as a wider set of relations that are central to well-being, wherein artistic expression furthers cultural continuity and resilience, community connection, and kinship to push back against forces of fracture and disruption imposed by colonialism.

The need for healing—not only individuals but health systems and practices—is clear, especially as the trauma of colonialism is continually revealed and perpetuated within health systems. The field of Indigenous health has recently begun to recognize the fundamental connection between creative expression and well-being. This book brings together scholarship by humanities scholars, social scientists, artists, and those holding experiential knowledge from across Turtle Island to add urgently needed perspectives to this conversation. Contributors embrace a diverse range of research methods, including community-engaged scholarship with Indigenous youth, artists, Elders, and language keepers.

The Arts of Indigenous Health and Well-Being demonstrates the healing possibilities of Indigenous works of art, literature, film, and music from a diversity of Indigenous peoples and arts traditions. This book will resonate with health practitioners, community members, and any who recognize the power of art as a window, an entryway to access a healthy and good life.

Editors: Nancy Van Styvendale,  J.D. McDougall,  Robert Henry, Robert Alexander Innes 

Chapters contributed by: Adesola Akinleye, Jessica Bardill, Beverley Diamond, Nikki Dragone, Jo-Ann Episkenew, Linda M Goulet, Louise Halfe, Desiree Hellegers, Petra Kuppers, Warren Linds, Gail MacKay, Margaret Noodin, Karyn Recollet, Andrea Riley Mukavetz, Mamata Pandey, Nuno F. Ribeiro, Alena Rosen, Karen Schmidt

 

“There is a genuinely beautiful life-force at work in this text: it’s artful and creative, readable and forceful. The Arts of Indigenous Health and Well-Being offers important contributions to knowledge and conversations about Indigenous health and the humanities in times and space of contemporary coloniality.”

– Sarah de Leeuw, Canada Research Chair, Humanities and Health Inequities Professor, Northern Medical Program, UNBC

 

“The unique content of The Art of Indigenous Health and Well-Being may be useful for communities to heal, and to preserve cultural and traditional knowledge that can be passed down in the written form. The content can spark dialogue and learning by being discussed and used by families, generations, health providers/healers and a wide array of learners.”

– Margot Latimer, Indigenous Health Chair, Faculty of Nursing, Dalhousie University

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Bodies of Knowledge: Three conversations on movement, communication and identity

Bodies of Knowledge: Three conversations on movement, communication and identity

I wrote an introductory chapter “Pondering In Embodiment” as response to the work done through the three interdisciplinary, community projects that the book goes on to review. The chapter ties together the three projects through the notion of being ‘in embodiment’ (rather than being ’embodied’). The chapter also serves to introduce the following sections of the book that discuss and reflect on the projects. 

“…Bodies of Knowledge attends to layers of experience for noticing surfaces that reflect ourselves-in-embodiment. In doing so, the projects acknowledge experience, reflections, histories and stories that are often underrepresented in social verbal discourse, but remain vibrant in the bodily experience of those who live them. The depth of layers of the lived-experience are vitalised through the nuance of the arts, and in that vitalisation, they communicate reflections of ourselves-in-embodiment.” p.21

Link to publishers 

Citation: Akinleye, A. (2021). ‘Pondering in Embodiment’, in Purseglove, L. (ed.) Bodies of Knowledge: Three Conversations on Movement, Communication and Identity. Loughborough and London: Radar and Live Art Development Agency, pp. 10-21.

open book pages

About this book: The human body is a site of knowledge production. It holds, shares, creates, enacts, transforms, contests, resists and performs ways of thinking and being in-and-against our worlds, histories and futures.

Featuring conversations, essays, drawings and photographs, Bodies of Knowledge reflects and builds on an interdisciplinary project involving artists, amateur and professional dancers, wrestlers, members of a trans community group and academic researchers interrogating how our bodies are both produced by and productive of knowledges.

From the entanglements of violence and care in the wrestling ring to negotiations of identity through Kathak dance, and the use of photography as a means to explore and communicate the euphorias and horrors of gender, this beautifully designed book explores why and how our bodies know what they know.

Contributors: Adesola Akinleye, Isaac Briggs, Jennifer Cooke, Laurie Crow, Thomas Dawkins (aka Cara Noir), Tara Fatehi Irani, Julia Giese, Martin Hargreaves, Claire Heafford, Joe Moran, Kesha Raithatha, Raju Rage, Nat Thorne, Claire Warden, Sam West and Sam Williams.

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Ballet, from Property to Art

Ballet, from Property to Art

In this chapter, I reflect on ballet using two lenses of property (ballet-as-property) and inheritance (the Manor House of Ballet). I draw on Cheryl Harris’s seminal paper ‘Whiteness as Property’ to explore how ballet could be seen as being treated as the property of a few rather than an art form in its own right. I suggest that being liberated into being ‘an art form’ offers ballet a rich future that avoids the decay of protectionism.

Citation: Akinleye, A.(2021) Ballet, from property to art, in Akinleye (ed.) (re:)claiming ballet London: Intellect books pp.21-35

Contents for context within book: 

(editor Adesola Akinleye)

Introduction: Regarding claiming ballet / reclaiming ballet

Part One – Histories

Chapter 1: Ballet, from property to Art – Adesola Akinleye

Chapter 2: Should there be a Female ballet canon? Seven Radical Acts of Inclusion – Julia Gleich and Molly Faulkner

Chapter 3: Arabesque en Noir: The Persistent Presence of Black Dancers in the American Ballet World – Joselli Audain Deans 

Chapter 4: Portrayals of Black people from the African Diaspora in western narrative ballets – Sandie Bourne

Part Two – Knowledges  

Chapter 5: The traces of my ballet body – Mary Savva  

Chapter 6: Ballet Beyond Boundaries – Personal History. Brenda Dixson Gottschild  

Chapter 7:“Auftanzen statt Aufgeben” and The Anti Fascist Ballet School -Elizabeth Ward 

Chapter 8: Dancing Across Historically Racist Borders – Kehinde Ishangi 

Part Three – Resiliences  

Chapter 9: Dance Theatre of Harlem’s radicalization of ballet in 1970s & 1980s – Theresa Ruth Howard  

Chapter 10: Personal testimony as social resilience – Theara J. Ward 

Chapter 11: “Can you feel it?”: Pioneering Pedagogies that Challenge Ballet’s Authoritarian Traditions – Jessica Zeller 

Chapter 12: The Ever After of Ballet – Selby Wynn Schwartz 

Chapter 13: Ballethnic Dance Company Builds Community: Urban Nutcracker leads the way – Nena Gilreath

Part four – Consciousnesses 

Chapter 14: The Counterpoint Project – When Life Doesn’t Imitate Art –  Endalyn Taylor

Chapter 15: Ballet’s Binary Genders in a Rainbow-Spectrum World:

A call for progressive pedagogies – Melonie B. Murray  

Chapter 16: Dancing through Black British ballet: Conversations with dancers – Adesola Akinleye and Tia-Monique Uzor 

Chapter 17: Ballet Aesthetics of Trauma, Development, and Functionality – Luc Vanier & Elizabeth Johnson 

About the contributors 

Index 

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Dancing through Black British ballet: conversations with dancers.

Dancing through Black British ballet: conversations with dancers.

Co-written with Tia-Monique Uzor, this chapter, reflects on conversations with a number of non-white British dancers who have a long standing dance careers in ballet. The chapter maps histories of resilience and resistance in Britain and internationally

Citation: Akinleye, A. & T Uzor (2021) Dancing through Black British ballet: conversations with dancers Akinleye (ed.) (re:)claiming ballet London: Intellect books pp.216-231

Contents for context within book: 

(editor Adesola Akinleye)

Introduction: Regarding claiming ballet / reclaiming ballet

Part One – Histories

Chapter 1: Ballet, from property to Art – Adesola Akinleye

Chapter 2: Should there be a Female ballet canon? Seven Radical Acts of Inclusion – Julia Gleich and Molly Faulkner

Chapter 3: Arabesque en Noir: The Persistent Presence of Black Dancers in the American Ballet World – Joselli Audain Deans 

Chapter 4: Portrayals of Black people from the African Diaspora in western narrative ballets – Sandie Bourne

Part Two – Knowledges  

Chapter 5: The traces of my ballet body – Mary Savva  

Chapter 6: Ballet Beyond Boundaries – Personal History. Brenda Dixson Gottschild  

Chapter 7:“Auftanzen statt Aufgeben” and The Anti Fascist Ballet School -Elizabeth Ward 

Chapter 8: Dancing Across Historically Racist Borders – Kehinde Ishangi 

Part Three – Resiliences  

Chapter 9: Dance Theatre of Harlem’s radicalization of ballet in 1970s & 1980s – Theresa Ruth Howard  

Chapter 10: Personal testimony as social resilience – Theara J. Ward 

Chapter 11: “Can you feel it?”: Pioneering Pedagogies that Challenge Ballet’s Authoritarian Traditions – Jessica Zeller 

Chapter 12: The Ever After of Ballet – Selby Wynn Schwartz 

Chapter 13: Ballethnic Dance Company Builds Community: Urban Nutcracker leads the way – Nena Gilreath

Part four – Consciousnesses 

Chapter 14: The Counterpoint Project – When Life Doesn’t Imitate Art –  Endalyn Taylor

Chapter 15: Ballet’s Binary Genders in a Rainbow-Spectrum World:

A call for progressive pedagogies – Melonie B. Murray  

Chapter 16: Dancing through Black British ballet: Conversations with dancers – Adesola Akinleye and Tia-Monique Uzor 

Chapter 17: Ballet Aesthetics of Trauma, Development, and Functionality – Luc Vanier & Elizabeth Johnson 

About the contributors 

Index 

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Play: ‘ideas are statements not of what is or what has been but of acts to be performed’

Play: ‘ideas are statements not of what is or what has been but of acts to be performed’

In this chapter I challenge the perceived divide between doing and thinking, inherited from a Western dualist divide between body and mind. I suggest playful acts of choreography to transgress the separation of physical and mental in the process of creating a theoretical framework for research study. Using what I am calling ‘choreo-thinking’ I offer possibilities of new methodologies for meaning making beyond the static of writing at a desk.

Citation: Akinleye, A. (2019). Play: ‘ideas are statements not of what is or what has been but of acts to be performed’. In J. Bacon, Hilton, R., Kramer, P., and Midgelow, V. (Ed.), Researching (in/as) Motion: A Resource Collection, Artistic Doctorates in Europe: Theatre Academy, University of the Arts Helsinki. 

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Epistemology of the weekend: Youth Dance Theatre

Epistemology of the weekend: Youth Dance Theatre

With Hopal Romans and Michael Joseph, in this chapter we remember our experiences in early Youth Dance Companies in Britain. For many young people dancing was a distraction from the turmoil of being a Black teenager in Britain in 1970s and 1980s. Dance also introduced the exciting new voices that were emerging around us in trans-Atlantic contemporary dance arts. Marginalized from auditioning for performing arts schools by cost and lack of access, as well as the openly racist aesthetic criteria for entry, our dance training comprised intense weekends of technique classes and rehearsals. Many young people from these early youth companies went on to have distinguished careers in dance internationally.

Citation: Akinleye, A., H. Romans and M. Joseph (2018) Epistemology of the weekend: Youth Dance Theatre, in Akinleye (ed.) Narratives in Black British dance: embodied practices. London: Palgrave MacMillian  pp.265-276

Contents for context within book: 

(editor Adesola Akinleye)

1. Narratives in Black British dance: an introduction – Adesola Akinleye

Part i 

2. “I don’t do Black-Dance, I am a Black dancer” – Namron

3. Dance Britannia: the impact of global shifts on dance in Britain – Christy Adair and Ramsay Burt

4. Negotiating African Diasporic identity in dance: brown bodies creating and existing in the British dance industry – Tia-Monique Uzor

5. Tracing the evolution of Black representation in ballet and the impact on Black British dancers today – Sandie Bourne

6. In-the-between-ness: decolonising and re-inhabiting our dancing – Adesola Akinleye and Helen Kindred

Part ii

7. Trails of Ado: Kokuma’s cultural self-defence – Thea Barnes

8. Moving Tu Balance: an African holistic dance as a vehicle for personal development from a Black British perspective – Sandra Golding

9. ‘Why I am not a fan of the Lion King’: ethically informed approach to the teaching and learning of South African dance forms in Higher Education in the United Kingdom – Sarahleigh Castelyn

10. Performativity of body paintingL symbolic ritual as diasporic identity – Chikukwango Cuxima-Zwa

11. Dancehall: a continuity of spiritual, corporeal practice in Jamaican dance – H. Patten

12. Our Ethiopian connection: embodied Ethiopian culture as a tool in urban-contemporary choreography – Ras Mikey (Michael) Courtney

13. Reflections: snapshots of dancing home, 1985, 2010 and 2012 – Hopal Romans

Part iii

14. Battling under Britannia’s shadow: UK jazz dancing in the 1970s and 1980s – Jane Carr

15. Caribfunk Technique: a new feminist/womanist futuristic technology in Black dance studies in Higher Education – A’Keitha Carey

16. More similarities than differences: searching for new pathways – Beverley Glean and Rosie Lehan

17. Epistemology of the weekend: Youth Dance Theatre – Hopal Romans, Adesola Akinleye, and Michael Joseph

18. Transatlantic voyages: then and now – Anita Gonzalez

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In-the-bewteen-ness: Decolonising and re-inhabiting our dancing

In-the-bewteen-ness: Decolonising and re-inhabiting our dancing

In this chapter, written with Helen Kindred, we discuss our need to be alert to polarising Western values creeping into our creative processes in the language we use to discuss, describe and facilitate dance.  The chapter explores our attempts to extract our ‘dancing bodies’ and choreographic processes from the Imperialist language of Western binaries. Despite our creative processes being informed by our multicultural, trans-national life experiences, how we talk about, or describe our work is often limited by the necessity to describe it using Western mainstream terms which we suggest is a continuing legacy of colonization. The chapter discusses ways we have sort to decolonize the environment of our creative exploration.

Citation: Akinleye, A. and H. Kindred (2018). In-the-Between-ness: Decolonising and re-inhabiting our dancing, in Akinleye (ed.) Narratives in Black British dance: embodied practices London: Palgrave MacMillian pp. 65-78.

Contents for context within book: 

(editor Adesola Akinleye)

1. Narratives in Black British dance: an introduction – Adesola Akinleye

Part i 

2. “I don’t do Black-Dance, I am a Black dancer” – Namron

3. Dance Britannia: the impact of global shifts on dance in Britain – Christy Adair and Ramsay Burt

4. Negotiating African Diasporic identity in dance: brown bodies creating and existing in the British dance industry – Tia-Monique Uzor

5.Tracing the evolution of Black representation in ballet and the impact on Black British dancers today – Sandie Bourne

6. In-the-between-ness: decolonising and re-inhabiting our dancing – Adesola Akinleye and Helen Kindred

Part ii

7. Trails of Ado: Kokuma’s cultural self-defence – Thea Barnes

8. Moving Tu Balance: an African holistic dance as a vehicle for personal development from a Black British perspective – Sandra Golding

9. ‘Why I am not a fan of the Lion King’: ethically informed approach to the teaching and learning of South African dance forms in Higher Education in the United Kingdom – Sarahleigh Castelyn

10. Performativity of body paintingL symbolic ritual as diasporic identity – Chikukwango Cuxima-Zwa

11. Dancehall: a continuity of spiritual, corporeal practice in Jamaican dance – H. Patten

12. Our Ethiopian connection: embodied Ethiopian culture as a tool in urban-contemporary choreography – Ras Mikey (Michael) Courtney

13. Reflections: snapshots of dancing home, 1985, 2010 and 2012 – Hopal Romans

Part iii

14. Battling under Britannia’s shadow: UK jazz dancing in the 1970s and 1980s – Jane Carr

15. Caribfunk Technique: a new feminist/womanist futuristic technology in Black dance studies in Higher Education – A’Keitha Carey

16. More similarities than differences: searching for new pathways – Beverley Glean and Rosie Lehan

17. Epistemology of the weekend: Youth Dance Theatre – Hopal Romans, Adesola Akinleye, and Michael Joseph

18. Transatlantic voyages: then and now – Anita Gonzalez

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Narratives in Black British Dance: an introduction

Narratives in Black British Dance: an introduction

In order to introduce the narratives in the chapters that follow across the book, this introductory chapter positions a range of approaches to the terms Black, British, and Dance. The chapter discusses how artists who identify are cross contribute to a dance scene whose complexities and stories are often invisiblized. The chapter discusses contexts for talking about the dancing body, to expose them as having concealed Black, British dance stories in the past. I draw attention to the context of the historical legacy of abuse to the ‘Black body’ and the effects the has on how Black dancers are audience today. I offer a (re)articulation of the physical and cultural mapping of the richness of British dance.

The book as a whole explores Black British dance from a number of previously-untold perspectives. Bringing together the voices of dance-artists, scholars, teachers and choreographers, it looks at a range of performing arts from dancehall to ballet, providing valuable insights into dance theory, performance, pedagogy, identity and culture. It challenges the presumption that Blackness, Britishness or dance are monolithic entities, instead arguing that all three are living networks created by rich histories, diverse faces and infinite future possibilities. Through a variety of critical and creative essays, this book suggests a widening of our conceptions of what British dance looks like, where it appears, and who is involved in its creation.

Citation: Akinleye, A.(2018). Narratives in Black British Dance: an introduction, in Akinleye (ed.) Narratives in Black British Dance: embodied practices. London: Palgrave MacMillian pp. 1- 17 

Contents for context with book: 

(editor Adesola Akinleye)

1. Narratives in Black British dance: an introduction – Adesola Akinleye

Part i 

2. “I don’t do Black-Dance, I am a Black dancer” – Namron

3. Dance Britannia: the impact of global shifts on dance in Britain – Christy Adair and Ramsay Burt

4. Negotiating African Diasporic identity in dance: brown bodies creating and existing in the British dance industry – Tia-Monique Uzor

5.Tracing the evolution of Black representation in ballet and the impact on Black British dancers today – Sandie Bourne

6. In-the-between-ness; decolonising and re-inhabiting our dancing – Adesola Akinleye and Helen Kindred

Part ii

7. Trails of Ado: Kokuma’s cultural self-defence – Thea Barnes

8. Moving Tu Balance: an African holistic dance as a vehicle for personal development from a Black British perspective – Sandra Golding

9. ‘Why I am not a fan of the Lion King’: ethically informed approach to the teaching and learning of South African dance forms in Higher Education in the United Kingdom – Sarahleigh Castelyn

10. Performativity of body paintingL symbolic ritual as diasporic identity – Chikukwango Cuxima-Zwa

11. Dancehall: a continuity of spiritual, corporeal practice in Jamaican dance – H. Patten

12. Our Ethiopian connection: embodied Ethiopian culture as a tool in urban-contemporary choreography – Ras Mikey (Michael) Courtney

13. Reflections: snapshots of dancing home, 1985, 2010 and 2012 – Hopal Romans

Part iii

14. Battling under Britannia’s shadow: UK jazz dancing in the 1970s and 1980s – Jane Carr

15. Caribfunk Technique: a new feminist/womanist futuristic technology in Black dance studies in Higher Education – A’Keitha Carey

16. More similarities than differences: searching for new pathways – Beverley Glean and Rosie Lehan

17. Epistemology of the weekend: Youth Dance Theatre – Hopal Romans, Adesola Akinleye, and Michael Joseph

18. Transatlantic voyages: then and now – Anita Gonzalez

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Narrating Spaces

Narrating Spaces

In this chapter I discuss creativity: creative processes from the perspective of someone who identifies as a Black, Woman, Artist. Immediately I need to point out that I by no means want to suggest that there is some kind of shared creative outcome that all Black Women Artists demonstrate. The nature of creativity seems to be that it is inherently individual in everyone. To assume it was the same across a group of people would be contradictory to the general assumption that creativity involves uniqueness.  Similarly, the notion of ‘Black’ and ‘woman’ are contested labels rather than fixed identities. So, this chapter is about what happens when the spectrums of Blackness, womanhood and creativity are thought about in terms of their relationship with each other. What rhythms emerge when all three are considered at the same time. In this way the chapter is not written only for those who identify as Black women artists, it is written to look at creative processes in general.

From early trailblazers to contemporary ground breakers, Black Women in Dance: Stepping Out of the Barriers, is an exciting publication celebrating and exploring the impact that Black women have made on the international dance ecology. This publication explores topics from the need for institutions and infrastructure to support work from African and African Caribbean artists, and the key role of women within these organisations, to artists’ journeys taken to develop new aesthetics and an individual choreographic voice. The contributors also reflect upon the obstacles they have had to overcome as they have progressed in their careers and some of the challenges they still have to face. Moreover, Black Women in Dance is a celebration of the tenacity, strength and creativity of the authors, their peers and their predecessors.

Citation: Akinleye, A. (2016) Narrating Spaces chapter in Brookes (ed.), Black Women in Dance: Stepping out of the barriers, UK: Serendipity Artists Movement Ltd, pp. 74 – 83

Contents for context within book:

(editor Pawlet Brookes)

Preface – Pawlet Brookes

Tipping The Balance of Power in the Dance World and Beyond – Jawole Willa Jo Zollar

The Contribution of Women in Supporting the Dance of the African Diaspora in Britain – Mercy Nabirye

Reflection, Revolution and Resolution: Black Dance in the UK 2000 to 2016 – Deborah Baddoo

The Talent is There, The Opportunities Are Not – Hilary S. Carty

The Dance of Leadership – Maureen Salmon

Infrastructure – Pam Johnson

Seven Stages of Creating – Catherine Dénécy

Narrating Spaces – Adesola Akinleye

The Grey Area – Jessica Walker

My Duality, My Strength – Sharon Watson

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