Adesola

Dancing through Black British ballet: conversations with dancers.

Dancing through Black British ballet: conversations with dancers.

Co-written with Dr Tia-Monique Uzor, this chapter, reflects on conversations with a number of non-white British dancers who have a long standing dance careers in ballet. The chapter maps histories of resilience and resistance in Britain and internationally

Citation: Akinleye, A. & T Uzor (2021) Dancing through Black British ballet: conversations with dancers Akinleye (ed.) (re:)claiming ballet London: Intellect books pp.216-231

Contents for context within book: 

(editor Adesola Akinleye)

Introduction: Regarding claiming ballet / reclaiming ballet

Part One – Histories

Chapter 1: Ballet, from property to Art – Adesola Akinleye

Chapter 2: Should there be a Female ballet canon? Seven Radical Acts of Inclusion – Julia Gleich and Molly Faulkner

Chapter 3: Arabesque en Noir: The Persistent Presence of Black Dancers in the American Ballet World – Joselli Audain Deans 

Chapter 4: Portrayals of Black people from the African Diaspora in western narrative ballets – Sandie Bourne

Part Two – Knowledges  

Chapter 5: The traces of my ballet body – Mary Savva  

Chapter 6: Ballet Beyond Boundaries – Personal History. Brenda Dixson Gottschild  

Chapter 7:“Auftanzen statt Aufgeben” and The Anti Fascist Ballet School -Elizabeth Ward 

Chapter 8: Dancing Across Historically Racist Borders – Kehinde Ishangi 

Part Three – Resiliences  

Chapter 9: Dance Theatre of Harlem’s radicalization of ballet in 1970s & 1980s – Theresa Ruth Howard  

Chapter 10: Personal testimony as social resilience – Theara J. Ward 

Chapter 11: “Can you feel it?”: Pioneering Pedagogies that Challenge Ballet’s Authoritarian Traditions – Jessica Zeller 

Chapter 12: The Ever After of Ballet – Selby Wynn Schwartz 

Chapter 13: Ballethnic Dance Company Builds Community: Urban Nutcracker leads the way – Nena Gilreath

Part four – Consciousnesses 

Chapter 14: The Counterpoint Project – When Life Doesn’t Imitate Art –  Endalyn Taylor

Chapter 15: Ballet’s Binary Genders in a Rainbow-Spectrum World:

A call for progressive pedagogies – Melonie B. Murray  

Chapter 16: Dancing through Black British ballet: Conversations with dancers – Adesola Akinleye and Tia-Monique Uzor 

Chapter 17: Ballet Aesthetics of Trauma, Development, and Functionality – Luc Vanier & Elizabeth Johnson 

About the contributors 

Index 

Posted by Adesola in Chapters

Ballet, from Property to Art

Ballet, from Property to Art

In this chapter, I reflect on ballet using two lenses of property (ballet-as-property) and inheritance (the Manor House of Ballet). I draw on Dr Cheryl Harris’s seminal paper ‘Whiteness as Property’ to explore how ballet could be seen as being treated as the property of a few rather than an art form in its own right. I suggest that being liberated into being ‘an art form’ offers ballet a rich future that avoids the decay of protectionism.

Citation: Akinleye, A.(2021) Ballet, from property to art, in Akinleye (ed.) (re:)claiming ballet London: Intellect books pp.21-35

Contents for context within book: 

(editor Adesola Akinleye)

Introduction: Regarding claiming ballet / reclaiming ballet

Part One – Histories

Chapter 1: Ballet, from property to Art – Adesola Akinleye

Chapter 2: Should there be a Female ballet canon? Seven Radical Acts of Inclusion – Julia Gleich and Molly Faulkner

Chapter 3: Arabesque en Noir: The Persistent Presence of Black Dancers in the American Ballet World – Joselli Audain Deans 

Chapter 4: Portrayals of Black people from the African Diaspora in western narrative ballets – Sandie Bourne

Part Two – Knowledges  

Chapter 5: The traces of my ballet body – Mary Savva  

Chapter 6: Ballet Beyond Boundaries – Personal History. Brenda Dixson Gottschild  

Chapter 7:“Auftanzen statt Aufgeben” and The Anti Fascist Ballet School -Elizabeth Ward 

Chapter 8: Dancing Across Historically Racist Borders – Kehinde Ishangi 

Part Three – Resiliences  

Chapter 9: Dance Theatre of Harlem’s radicalization of ballet in 1970s & 1980s – Theresa Ruth Howard  

Chapter 10: Personal testimony as social resilience – Theara J. Ward 

Chapter 11: “Can you feel it?”: Pioneering Pedagogies that Challenge Ballet’s Authoritarian Traditions – Jessica Zeller 

Chapter 12: The Ever After of Ballet – Selby Wynn Schwartz 

Chapter 13: Ballethnic Dance Company Builds Community: Urban Nutcracker leads the way – Nena Gilreath

Part four – Consciousnesses 

Chapter 14: The Counterpoint Project – When Life Doesn’t Imitate Art –  Endalyn Taylor

Chapter 15: Ballet’s Binary Genders in a Rainbow-Spectrum World:

A call for progressive pedagogies – Melonie B. Murray  

Chapter 16: Dancing through Black British ballet: Conversations with dancers – Adesola Akinleye and Tia-Monique Uzor 

Chapter 17: Ballet Aesthetics of Trauma, Development, and Functionality – Luc Vanier & Elizabeth Johnson 

About the contributors 

Index 

Posted by Adesola in Chapters

Concrete-Water-Flesh

Concrete-Water-Flesh

Link to web-site 

Concrete-Water-Flesh is a collaborative project with Helen Kindred which places bodily experiences as central to our understanding and Being-in-Place. The project combines the research interests of Adesola and Helen in the development of new physical site-specific  and web-based choreographic work. Stimulated by the Place of the city and Place of the shore.

charcoal drawing bY Andrew Hinton
Posted by Adesola in Artworks

Royal Institute of British Architects film commissions 2021

Royal Institute of British Architects film commissions 2021

Link to film on RIBA channel

 

How do we remember as a society: whispered memory.

How do we remember as a society: pieces of me (in you) 

How do we remember as a society: catching a memory  (published by RIBA on Instagram only)

The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) has commissioned the artist, scholar and choreographer Adesola Akinleye to create a series of new video artworks inspired by the work of Sir David Adjaye OBE as part of the 2021 Royal Gold Medal celebrations. The videos are now available to watch on the RIBA Youtube channel.

Akinleye’s pieces respond to a prevalent theme throughout Adjaye’s practice, that of memory, through videos that convey how memories of specific places keep us connected to the sites that we have been physically separated from during the pandemic. The videos invite viewers to be fully present in a cathartic experience that will temporarily take you outside of yourself to share in Akinleye’s multilayered assemblage of memories.

Akinleye recollects a number of sites that remain important to her and therefore form part of her identity despite their distance from the location of her home. She remembers the presence of her body in different places and conveys this through a layering of imagery, movement and sound that playfully celebrates the glitch in the Zoom background algorithm. Shot entirely at home, Akinleye reflects on the past year of isolation within the confines of our domestic interiors, and suggests recognising shared experiences of specific buildings can form a collective memory that holds us together as a society.

About the Royal Gold Medal
The Royal Gold Medal has been awarded annually since 1848 and is recognized as the UK’s highest honour for architecture. The award is approved personally by Her Majesty The Queen and is given to a person or group of people who have had a significant influence “either directly or indirectly on the advancement of architecture.” The 2021 recipient of the award is Sir David Adjaye OBE.

Posted by Adesola in Artworks

Morning Conversations at MIT

Morning Conversations at MIT

Eight podcasts of the Morning Conversation (Choreographing the City) serious, part of Adesola’s residency at MIT hosted by Prof. Gediminas Urbonas with ACT, in The Center for Art, Science & Technology.

These podcasts are the result of the Morning Conversation series held in the Fall 2020 Choreographing the City class, offered by the Art, Culture and Technology Program at MIT in partnership with Theatrum Mundi and Professor Richard Sennett. The course was taught by Professor Gediminas Urbonas, and MIT Center for Art, Science, and Technology visiting artist and choreographer, Dr. Adesola Akinleye. 

Dr Adesola Akinleye’s residency looks at emerging lexicons for movement in urban space that connect to ideas shared across dance-making and choreography to city-making and building community. This series of eight episodes is hosted by Dr. Adesola Akinleye, Professor Gediminas Urbonas, and Chucho Ocampo Aguilar. 

Podcast episodes with: 1) Ellie Cosgrave,  2) Diane McIntyre,  3) Richard Sennett,  4) Arianna Mazzeo,  5) Hūfanga ‘Ōkusitino Māhina,  6) Scott L. Pratt,  7) John Bingham-Hall, 8) Liz Lerman

Episode One – Bridges: discovery and togetherness

In this first episode of Choreographing the City, Dr. Adesola Akinleye and Professor Gediminas Urbonas discuss discovery, togetherness, bridges, and power within choreographing and engineering with Dr. Ellie Cosgrave. Dr. Cosgrave is a lecturer in Urban Innovation and Policy at University College London’s department of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Public Policy, and co-director of the Urban Innovation and Policy Lab.

‘The conversation sets the scene for why this inquiry of Choreographing the city and reflects the frameworks to enable practices (such as dance and engineering) to come together without just re-establishing the same old issues but in each other’s spaces. The conversations suggest noticing constructions for how discovery, power and encounter offer starting points for how to arrive in the togetherness of collaboration across interdisciplinary inquiry. We also discuss moments in terms of the poetics of encounters with weight.’ – Adesola

Read Episode One notes and references here: 

Episode Two – A different kind of preciseness: ‘It’s about the movement’

In this second episode of Choreographing the City, Dr. Adesola Akinleye and Professor Gediminas Urbonas are joined by eminent choreographer Dianne McIntyre. The conversation continues thinking about the differences and similarities across choreography and engineering raised by the first morning conversation (Bridges: discovery and togetherness). We begin to discuss processes for composition. 

‘I begin the conversation by overviewing a common assumption that choreographic-thinking could be positioned as challenging the rigidity of rules and regulations inherently in both architecture and engineering. However, there is also preciseness (including rules and at time unfair regulations) in dance. I ask renowned choreographer Dianne McIntyre to expound on this further. As the conversation progresses the intension of movement and the coming together of space, moment and human body further underlines my residency’s suggestion that the collaboration across disciplines is not about the production of coming together but about the better understanding of processes that interdisciplinary inquiry can nourish.  We also note that the transaction of choreographer, dancer and musician exemplifies the wider transaction of being present in Place.’ – Adesola

Read Episode Two notes and references here: 

Episode Three – Resistance and double-barrelled aspiration

In this third episode of Choreographing the City at MIT, Dr. Adesola Akinleye and Professor Gediminas Urbonas are joined by urbanist and writer Richard Sennett in the third of Akinleye’s Choreographing the City residency morning conversation series (with a discussion question from Alan Boldon). 

‘The conversation interrogates the notion of how “double-barrelled aspirations” (in this case within choreography or architectural practices) strive to both create within their own discourses and at the same time become available for those outside their practice. We discuss how the methodology for this by its nature speaks to the political. The conversation suggests ‘raw problems’ can inform epistemologies of resistance. The conversation begins with Richard Sennett further describing the 1960 and 1970 post-contemporary dance scene that Ms. McIntyre introduced in the previous conversation.’ – Adesola 

Read Episode Three notes and references here: 

Episode Four – Courage and the Unknown

In this fourth episode of Choreographing the City at MIT, Dr. Adesola Akinleye and Professor Gediminas Urbonas are joined by lecturer in design engineering Dr Arianna Mazzeo. 

‘This is an open conversation with questions that contribute to Dr Mazzeo’s thoughts from Joy Buolamwini, Jesus Ocampo Aguilar, Pohao Chi, and Shucao Mo. The conversation includes questions about choreography as embodied algorithm, the importance of the notion of relationship in situating an understanding of embodiment, and the vitality of ‘failure’ as a tool for embracing exploration. The conversation sits alongside the previous discussion with Richard Sennett in looking at the multiple constructions for what choreography can mean. Yet within these meanings, connection, relationship and social responsibility seem to always remerge perhaps they could be considered as core elements for the realisation of embodiment – for the realisation of presence in a situation to which the body is responding. I am interested by the very different uses and meanings for ‘choreography’ that those in different fields attribute to it.’ – Adesola

Read Episode Four notes and references here: 

Episode Five – Improvisations in time/space, form/content

In this fifth episode of Choreographing the City at MIT, Dr Adesola Akinleye and Professor Gediminas Urbonas are joined by Tongan philosopher Hūfanga Dr ‘Ōkusitino Māhina in the fifth of my Choreographing the City residency’s morning conversation series; with comments and questions from Adriana Lear and Maui-TāVā-He-Ako Professor Tēvita O. Ka’ili.

‘In the last conversation the notion of choreography is discussed almost as an instrument in a process beyond it. My relationship with or meaning for choreography is as a method that emerges from methodologies that involve (or even center) around a somatic empirical ontological understanding of being present in the world. To this end Dr Māhina shares understanding for how the human experience is part of the wider web of existence of which I see dance (or the bodily of the somatic) as a method (of many) for meaning making. Thus, choreography is a method for understanding the transaction of self with space/time that is Place. Dr Māhina offers modes for revealing this interconnection and inter separation grounded in Tonga philosophy particularly Tā/Vā-ism. My own methodological framework is grounded in a Lakota (and Yoruba) worldview, of which these indigenous philosophies share some similarities, particularly the sense of interwoven relationship of human with environment rather than human over environment. When we dance, we have an inkling of what it is to be a part of it all.’ – Adesola

Read Episode Five notes and references here: 

Episode Six – Agency and the Demonic

In this sixth episode of Choreographing the City at MIT, Dr. Adesola Akinleye and Professor Gediminas Urbonas are joined by philosopher Dr Scott L. Pratt, with further comments from Ms Dianne McIntyre.

‘In the conversation Dr Pratt discusses his theory on Logic of Place which I have used extensively in my work particularly in the monograph Dance, Architecture and Engineering (Dance in Dialogue). Dr Pratt’s notions of The Logic of Place, boundary, and Logic of Home draws on a number of Native American nations worldviews with interesting echoes of the importance of regarding the intra-connection of land, humans and non-humans as vital (as discussed in the previous podcast with Hûfanga Dr Okusitino Mahina). I feel dance-choreography involves knowledges that allow us to become aware of or make porous the construction for Place that emerges from the conversation.’ – Adesola 

Read Episode Six notes and references here: 

Episode Seven – Scores and infrastructure, instruction and encounter

In this seventh episode of Choreographing the City at MIT, Dr. Adesola Akinleye and Professor Gediminas Urbonas are joined by urban theorist and director of Theatrum Mundi Dr John Bingham-Hall.

‘Moving forward from the notion of agency and things having their own futures proposed in the last conversation with Dr Pratt, this episode looks at a number of research projects combining ideas from urbanism and the arts, carried out by Theatrum Mundi. We particularly discuss how infrastructural ways of thinking can help us understand what makes places work as active forms, rather than finished artefacts. Dr Bingham-Hall discusses looking at scores as offers of possibility and how this notion can be used as an instrumental approach to design. This speaks to the concept of four-dimensional space that Dr Mahina discusses in episode five: how we create art or cities that are four-dimensional (in movement, emerging, ever connecting and separating) seeing the lived-experience (or the matrix of mind-ful-body in environment) as including the temporal in order to be in relationship with […]. To be in relationship with […] being a key notion across all the Morning Conversations and my residency in general.’ – Adesola

Read Episode Seven notes and references here: 

Episode Eight – Into Motion

In this eighth and final episode of Choreographing the City at MIT, Dr. Adesola Akinleye and Professor Gediminas Urbonas are joined by eminent choreographer and educator Liz Lerman.

‘This conversation brings together key ideas I feel have been generated from the residency so far. This includes some of the notions/language that I am taking forward as part of this interdisciplinary exploration of Choreographing the City – part of the lexicon we have been looking for. These key words are power (to and over), preciseness, improvisation/response/spontaneity, connection/disconnection, growth, resistance, boundary (not discussed in this conversation but also included in this list I am taking forward are agency, four-dimensional space, and score). Liz addresses this language in terms of how it manifests in her own practice. Together we share the magnitude, joy and importance of attempting to understand each other at the boundaries, membranes, edges that are perceived in order to shape ourselves/our disciplines/ our cities.’ – Adesola

Read Episode Eight notes and references here: 

Posted by Adesola in Podcasts

*contact*improvisation*: recognising institutional racism in our dance classrooms.

*contact*improvisation*: recognising institutional racism in our dance classrooms.

This annual event provides a meeting point for artists working within higher education institutions. It is a platform for artists to engage with a current issue facing artist teachers in the HE context, fostering knowledge exchange and collaboration.

September 2020 roundtable: Recognising Institutional Racism in our Classrooms  Independent Dance in collaboration with Dr Adesola Akinleye. Chaired by Dr Adesola Akinleye with Heni Hale

In response to Black Lives Matter and with the aim of being part of the vast and hopefully positive changes that can come about through crisis we asked:

How can HE contribute to moving towards a just society?

Our focus is to come together to recognise ways in which we might be unknowingly performing systemic racism in our classrooms, language, and sense of history. How much are notions of (hyper) professionalism tied up with a colonial outlook? In preparation, ID commissioned an essay by Dr Adesola Akinleye as a starting point and provocation for discussion. It is available here. 

Akinleye suggests identifying 3 important and separate lenses through which to observe and work :

1) ‘justice’ (witness, acknowledge, ‘that shouldn’t have happened’, I hear you’)

2) ‘education’ (understanding, comprehending the nuances of the system, what is this system? How does it ‘work’?)

3) ‘personal work’ (what is / has my role been in that system?, where is my power? in it / to change it?, committing to change).

These lenses provided a structure for the roundtable discussions.

Read the essay 

Posted by Adesola in Articles

Editorial: Wright-ing the Somatic, Narrating the Bodily

Editorial: Wright-ing the Somatic, Narrating the Bodily

– editorial for guest editorial with Helen Kindred.

Authors: Akinleye, Adesola; Kindred, Helen
Source: Journal of Dance & Somatic Practices, Volume 11, Number 1, 1 July 2019, pp. 3-6(4)

Publisher: Intellect

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1386/jdsp.11.1.3_2

In the top 3 most downloaded articles in the JDSP journal in 2020. (Intellect report)

Excerpt:

‘…We suggest the somatic knowing of dance challenges us to enter into communication across and through the skin of the material body to the wider human lived-experience of the partnerships of being. In this special issue, we have curated articles that explore how we tell the tale of our movement craft (the wright-ing of dance), our embodied experiences, and share our practices: how we narrate the bodily…’

Posted by Adesola in Articles

Untitled: women’s work

Untitled: women’s work

This work is dance-based research into the lived experiences of women living and working in the Flint area, Michigan. It is an attempt to take the body seriously when we talk about women’s work.  Untitled: women’s work is both scholarly art and artistic research using narrative inquiry, dance and film as research methodology.   In it women express what they hope for in a good job and the barriers they encounter in searching for and keeping them.  Specifically we draw out two themes in brining home the lived experience of working: rhythms and relationships and their continual establishment, disruption, negotiation and maintenance. 

Posted by Adesola in Artworks

Narrating Spaces

Narrating Spaces
PhD Post-doc work (2012 -2017) – This work developed  methodology and methods for dance as a way to facilitating the expression of people’s lived-experiences in specific places. This seemed to acknowledge their presence in communities through recognising their bodily experiences. Untitled: women’s work (Flint, USA), Undercurrents: Flint Water Dances (Flint, USA), Movements, Narratives and Meanings: Border Identities (Enniskillen and Belfast, NI), Her Life In Movement: reflections on embodiment as a methodology (book chapter). This work is mapped in the Narrating Spaces web-site 

Untitled: women’s work (2014 – 2015)

Untitled: women’s work (originally called Living Jobs), is an interdisciplinary, multimedia work of scholarly art. While policy conversations about employment are ubiquitous especially during election years and there is a plethora of scholarship on all aspects of labor and, the lived experience of working in all its complexities is difficult to capture. Yet, the immense popularity and staying power of such books as Studs Terkel’s Working: People Talk About What They Do All Day (1974)) and Barbara Ehrenreich’s Nickle and Dimed: On (not) getting By in America (2001) underscores that there is an audience and need for narratives about particular individual experiences of work — precisely the type of fine grained detail that often gets left out of academic and policy debates but that art can capture.

The research is dance-based exploring  the lived experiences of women living and working in the Flint and Detroit, Michigan area. It is an attempt to take the body seriously when we talk about women’s work.  Living Jobs is both scholarly art and artistic research using narrative inquiry, dance and film as research methodologies.   In it women express what they hope for in a good job and the barriers they encounter in searching for and keeping them.  Specifically we draw out two themes in brining home the lived experience of working: rhythms and relationships and their continual establishment, disruption, negotiation and maintenance. 

This research was commissioned by University of Michigan CEW/NCRW conference on women’s ecomonic security, held May 14 – 16 2014.

Co-sponsors of the conference: Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, School of Social Work, Institute for Research on Women and Gender

Link to Untitled: women’s work film of the work and research process. 

Link to Her life in Movement: reflections of embodiment as a methodology Chapter 

Soma centred research project
The soma centred nature of the project addresses the belief that the lived experience is multi-layered, and that experience defies the positivist limitations of a single coherent narrative.

We use the language of dance and image as a methodology in order to address the multi-layered nature of the lived experience, particularly the translation from the original sensation of immediate empiricism that informs participants’ narratives, to the qualification of memories as they are solidified into independent events. It is in this translation of experience to communication that meaning can be locked into written text and in doing so become two-dimensional. From the soma centred approach of the research this is too early in the understanding process. By drawing on movement (dance) and image (film) the research seeks to provide for the somatic. Findings from the research will therefore be presented in the multi-layered format of dance, film and conversation.

‘Events turn into objects, things with a meaning. They may be referred to when they do not exist, and thus be operative among things distant in space and time, through vicarious presence in a new medium.’ (Dewey 1958 p.166)

This interdisciplinary research and presentation process allows for meaning to be operative beyond written text while not loosing meaning in abstract sensation. The nature of the topic “what makes a good job” affects people on levels from ethereal constructs of identification of Self to the physical needs of a hungry body. The arts are used in the research process to accept the challenges of translation of embodied experiences. This is done to acknowledge that the embodied being  is not wedded to a chronological framework for meaning making nor relies on a totalizing discourse in order to communicate memory.  

Methodology: A Narrative inquiry / ethnographic framework using interviews and ethnographic observation to inquiry into ‘what makes a good job?’ Six participants drawn from the Detroit / Flint area will be consulted.

Undercurrents: Flint Water Dances (2016 – 2017)

In January & February 2017 Adesola will held five workshops at Odyssey House with Elder women exploring ideas and stories about water and the Flint water crisis which had been effecting them since 2014. These were documented and aimed to ensure the women in the workshops had a full part on the process of making the water dances. 

In March Adesola worked with dancers from Flint Institue of Music (Dance Department) to devise and rehearse a  12 minute dance work in response to the Odyssey women’s stories. Adesola  worked with the Flint Youth Ballet (FYB) dancers March 24-26 and March 31-April 1.  They were joined by the Odyssey house women to finalise the create of an inter-generational performance-work. FYB provide costuming. The choreography grow out of the stories collected at Odyssey House and the FYB dancers’ response to them and their own experience of the Flint water crisis.  This will be a collaborative work facilitated by choreographer Adesola.  We are hoping for around 10 dancers who are secure enough in their dancing to use it to share the stories.  The resulting work was part of the Festival of Dance May 6 and 7 at the U of M-Flint Theatre as well as part of Global Water Dances June 24 2017.

 

Concrete -Water-Flesh: Global Water Dances, Deptford 2021

DancingStrong Movement Lab. with Irie! Dance Theatre and The Albany. 

Movement, Narratives and Meaning: Border Identities (2017)

Responding to the electoral mandate the 2016 ‘Brexit’ Referendum and USA election votes appear to have given policy makers, it is important that people in everyday communities have modes to create being heard. Alongside this, the surprise political analysts expressed at the ballot box results betrays the need to give attention to the narratives of individual lived-experiences. This pilot project, Movement, Narratives and Meanings(2), sought to use dance and film to acknowledge that the complexities of people’s lives are beyond what can be expressed in just words.

Dance-based workshops were held with people living in Northern Ireland: in Enniskillen, Fivemiletown and Belfast. I collaborated with London based film maker Anton Califano, Northern Ireland based dance-artists Dylan Quinn and Sheena Kelly and Robbie Breadon and Fi Gilmour of Common Ground NI. The project consisted of film and dance participatory workshops that facilitated members of the local communities in creating choreography around the topic of borders, boundaries and edges. Participants shared their movement-memories through site-specific dance and film, in places meaningful to the memory-narrative. This created little movement vignettes that (re)inhabit places of significance in personal histories. The project started a conversation about Place and Identity. Funding from Middlesex University.

Article about the project Border Identities was published in Animated Spring 2018

The following film is one of versions of the documentation of the project.

Posted by Adesola in Research

ILA project: the making of ‘Found’

ILA project: the making of ‘Found’

Link to archive 

Found is an engaging and lively 40-minute music & dance performance aimed at children aged 4-7 years and their families in theatre and educational settings.  With live music and an invitation to audiences to play and participate, Found looks at what connects us to each other and our surroundings drawing on stories of discovery, exploration and travel.  A drift on their own islands the performers bring audiences into a magical world where connections become visible as soundwaves ripple through bodies and lines and angles converge in new journeys and forms.

Inspired by objects selected from local museums, Found was created through the ILA project that asked How young people from immigrant families reclaim the museum, and their own cultural landscapes?

ILA project making Found to place in residencies with three Primary schools.  The show provides an adventure in colour, line, music and dance which children can enjoy and participate in, and feel free to be themselves.

Found was created out of the ILA project. This was a project bring schools together their local museum or gallery In London UK, Bristol UK and Flint USA.

The article ‘…wind in my hair I feel a part of everywhere…’:creating dance for young audiences narrates emplacement published in Journal of Dance and Somatic Studies 2019, was written as reflection about performing the work. 

Posted by Adesola in Artworks